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Jay-Z Disses Hammer, Hammer Responds!


bigted

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This whole topic of Hammer vs Jay-Z is extremely ridiculous. Hammer is one of the greatest entertainers ever, however, the Jay-Z didn't diss him! Jay-Z was just stating the facts, like he said, he's not the 1st person to say it. I agree with Turntable, its Hammer's own fault. There's no way Hammer TRULY believes he's going to defeat Jay in a battle or knock him out of the game. That's just false hope. Hammer sees an opportunity to get back in the spotlight, and he's going for it. This battle was dead anyway because Jay won't respond because it wasn't a diss!

Hammer's "response" is the 1st "diss" song you can dance too but c'mon, I know Hammer's always been "average" when it comes to lyrics and his writing, he could've spit some more bars, 8 bars really? Not really doing any damage. The song is okay at best, I wouldn't say it's ill but its not bad. Just average.

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Hammer got an old school hip hop style, a lot of the great golden age songs have shorter verses but it's the energy that seperates them from other songs, Hammer brings the song to life, a lot of Jay-Z songs are long and boring to me 'cause he doesn't bring much energy a lot of times, sometimes you could do it simple... Btw, blame Jay-Z for the wack songs on the radio 'cause he promoted a lot of it in recent years, think about it...
One thing that pisses me off about Jay-Z fans is that they act like he's god that can't do no wrong, nobody's perfect, how could he be a rap savior if he's destroying it halfway, this line that LL said in "Dear Hip Hop" sound like he was dissing Jay-Z: "If he's so hot then why is the culture frozen?" I remember when the Nets were a playoff team they'd really be giving him props for having part ownership but now that they've been bad over the last year or so hardly anybody mentions that he has ownership, lol, gotta take the good with the bad.... Btw, sure you could call Hammer a fool all you want but it's not like he blew it all on drugs like other rappers in hip hop have done, he gave a lot back to his 'hood he never forgot where he came from, he keeps it real more than a lot of peoples favorite rappers do, I think more rappers should show him love for being a role model for the youth rather than tear him down for being too kind, that's what wrong with hip hop, there's few role models in it right now....

Edited by bigted
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Bottom line, most of these rap fans are idiots if you think about it, they don't know a good song if it hits them, in reality Hammer can't knock Jay-Z 'cause KRS couldn't knock out Nelly from the game when he came out with the stronger diss tracks than Nelly did, Jay-Z never responded to Dipset or 50 Cent either when they made diss tracks towards him, Jay-Z is not a good battle rapper, we all saw what happened when he tried to battle Nas, he acts like a diva 'cause he got SO much money and sells SO much records that he thinks he's too big to defend himself, that's not the essence of being a true hip hop artist you have to stand up and defend yourself.... btw all this MC Hammer bashing for going bankrupt needs to stop, it's not like he's the only rapper to go bankrupt, even our favorite rappers like Fresh Prince and LL Cool J went bankrupt early in their careers too, or will he be the last rapper to go bankrupt, it wouldn't surprise me if the SO called king of rap Jay-Z goes bankrupt either and if it he does maybe some younger rapper will come in and make fun of him for that too, like the bible says you reap what you sow....

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I'm glad Jay-Z actually gives him props in this book. But I'm also glad Hammer did this track. And I read the news about Jay-Z talking politics...which is ridiculous. He's just trying to take a page out of The Fresh Prince Book of Hip-Hop. The difference, FP has made comments about the state of the world that show he's done his homework. FP also carries himself in a way that has him respected. Jay-Z simply can't be taken seriously at all at this point.

------------------------------------------

Jay-Z Says Hammer Will Be 'Embarrassed' When His Book Comes Out

Jay-Z isn't taking MC Hammer's dis video 'Better Run Run' too seriously. The 'U Can't Touch This' rapper slams Jay-Z in the recent video, accusing him of being an impostor who swiped his "swagger."

The video was in response to Jay-Z's verse in a new Kanye West song, 'So Appalled,' where he referred to Hammer's notorious money troubles during the '90s. But Jay-Z sounded incredulous in a British radio interview (via the NY Daily News). "I didn't know that wasn't on the table for discussion."

He also says that he only has nice things to say about the legend and does so in his book 'Decoded.'

"He's going to be embarrassed, I said some really great things about him in the book ... It is what it is. He took it the wrong way." 'Decoded' hits stores Nov. 16.

Earlier in the week, Jay-Z made his political aspirations know, saying, "Give me a chance, maybe in eight years, I'll be the president."

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I think he's good at making money and being popular...but I don't know about his skills as a business man. Rocawear is still going but it's not booming. He ran DefJam into the ground which negatively effected popular music. To me he's just an average rapper who married Beyonce.

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Yeah I hear that Jay-Z wants to change his last name to Knowles 'cause he knows that Beyonce has more power than him, lol

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He did not run Def Jam into the ground, he stopped promoting music we like, which was good for bussines, because "his" artists are best-sellers. Unlike Roc-A-Fella, Def Jam was succesfull (unlike Dame's new thing). He als runs night clubs and restaurants which do very good, and that is not easy. Most of his money is not coming from his music, and he's close to being a billionaire, so he must be doing something right aint it. And when it comes to Hip Hop, Hove is a legend, you two are probably the only two people who think diffrently, thats fine, but ya'll must undertandd that convincing other people of that is gonna be hopeless, the man released a few classics and has been going strong for a long time now. I do not like all his stuff, hell no I don't, but I'm not gonna front. I dislike most of KRS's work and I think his character ofs questionable, but I give him his credit.

Edited by Turntable
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I made this post 2 times just now so hopefully the 3rd times a charm, lol...Turntable the reason why many people think so highly about Jay-Z is 'cause they're ignorant about hip hop's history, cats like AJ and me are true hip hop heads who know about all the great rappers that's why we don't think Jay-Z is on that level, a lot of young suckas never knew about MC Hammer until now...Btw, this "Bring Our Brothers Home" video by MC Hammer displays that he can do strong and lengthy lyrical songs with intelligence about current event issues, I think classic mcs like him, LL, FP, KRS, and Chuck D would make damn good politicians since people can relate to what they say in their music and they're strong character humans:

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Jay-Z is a good lyricist, he has a good flow and a good ear for beats. He is not average. He made average records, but he is not average. He is very good, he is better than Hammer. You two arent the only two true Hip Hop heads on the planet. There are a lot more and they'd all put Jigga on their list, a list that 50 Cent or Lil Wayne does not come close to. I'm sure KRS puts Jigga on his list.

Edited by Turntable
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Well like I stated earlier I'm a realist, I'll be quick to tell you that Jay-Z does have talent, I'd pick up a CD from him faster than 50 Cent or Lil' Waynes of the world but that does not make him a legend, even Vanilla Ice is a better rapper than Lil' Wayne so let's not get carried away now, compare Jay-Z to real mcs like KRS, LL, Fresh Prince, Rakim, etc. and he falls short, Hammer is a much better artist than people give him credit for, he outperformed a lot of the great rappers of all time on the stage in the golden era, everybody had their own original style back then, Hammer held his own no question about it, there's a reason why he sold millions of albums back then he worked hard, you actually needed to have talent to sell records back in the day but now you could be on Disney and go platinum, he's one of the few rappers that James Brown respected for sampling him so that should count for something too.... Now it's a fact that a lot of people that
listen to Jay-Z don't know about rappers like Big Daddy Kane
that's what Game said on "Game's Pain" and that's true, I'm
willing to bet on a stack of bibles that most who consider
Jay-Z the GOAT of rap don't own a Big Daddy Kane CD..
As fans of Will we should realise that the reason why fans
don't give Hammer as much credit as Jay-Z is 'cause he don't
use profanity in his music, it's the reason why they think
Eminem's a better rapper than Will, kids wanna hear profane
songs, but they all got talent in
reality as a realist I see that, since I could appreciate
all sides of rap, I'm willing to bet that if FP and Hammer
made 'parental advisory' rap that more of these kids would
rank 'em higher than they do, that's why some kids like LL
since some of his albums did have 'parental advisory' but others
don't like LL him at the same time 'cause most of his don't...

I don't really like hardcore
rap as much as kids do that's why I play FP and Hammer more than Jay-Z and
Eminem, and when it comes to hardcore rap DMX and 2Pac do it more effectively, the people who respect music with substance
and want to raise their kids properly do respect
FP and Hammer(rappers like Heavy D and Kid N Play also fall
in this category) and that's a fact...

Edited by bigted
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I wanted to make a point clear from what I was saying in that other post, rather than keep editing and editing, lol... There are plenty of real hip hop fans who do appreciate versatility 'cause it's a fact that back in the golden era JJFP, LL Cool J, MC Hammer, Heavy D, NWA, and Public Enemy all toured together and the shows sold out, if more variety was promoted it'd do well... Today though kids are forced fed with the same crap being promoted that's why they think Jay-Z and Eminem are so great but those who know about the golden age hip hop don't think so highly about them, that's the final point I wanna make in this thread, peace....

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I understand what both sides are saying. Jay Z is not a bad rapper. He is actually pretty good. Its just that people dont know better and thats why most kids out there are calling him Best rapper alive, ignoring that he is just a late part of a top 15, at best. But he can rap, lets not get confused on that. He may have his satanic admiration's and some not so good albums here and there, but the guy is a machine.

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Oh yeah, I had to find this quote from Chuck D's " Fight The Power" book that he made on MC Hammer, I wanna give this to every kid and so called "hip hop head" who thinks Jay-Z' the greatest while Hammer's the wackest, they need to get slapped back into reality, I went to bed last night after reading that disturbing Bill Clinton comment on Lil' Wayne so I was restless to say the least, he has to be checked for Alzheimers if he thinks Lil' Wayne is smart while he had the damn nerve to say 2Pac was uneducated when he was president, 2Pac's rolling in his grave right now, that statement the former president made is disrespectful to real hip hop... I'm probably gonna write 5 songs to get this energy out my system, anyway here's the quote, Chuck D sums everything I want to say:

"Headz are a category of people who are into being totally immersed in the thickness of the Hip-Hop culture. Headz dictate which way the culture is running at a particular time. A lot of times the headz in Hip-Hop, those that are at the forefront of the culture, dilute the culture with a lack of proper information about Black life in general. We as Black people have had to disacknowledge a lot of things that we have done in our past. Hip-Hop's history and culture have been disacknowledged and pushed to the side, even by headz. We can't think that a lot of things that have happened in Hip-Hop have happened for the first time.
You have people out there that call themselves headz in the 1990s who can't even name the five members of the Furious Five. Whether they're headz or not is questionable.
For somebody to come off and call Hammer whack to me is a typical white-oriented statement to trigger off the ignorance of Black ill-formed "Player hating." We have a crab-in-the-barrel mentality amongst us to say, "Man, he's making it too good, f him." There was nothing wrong with Hammer rapping over what he was rapping over. He was rapping to the best of his abilities coming out of the west coast. He danced. A lot of Black people on the East Coast were like "What the f is that?" without even taking into consideration that dancing is part of our makeup. He didn't do anything different. He danced, he rapped over a certain aspect of music that he picked. But what I was as being the first strain of the virus was when Black kids were saying: "Man,he's getting too big. F Hammer." White kids would jump on and mimic the same sentiment. When white kids would jump on what they heart of the jealous "player hating" in the black community, it end up being written about in magazines and newspapers.
I remember meeting Hammer in 1987 with Daddy-O of Stetsasonic. He started his own independent thing out on the West coast like many guys did: Too Short with his whole operation, Eazy E, and all those guys out on the West Coast. I saw him go from "Let's Get It Started" then he did the song "Turn This Mutha Out," which moved him into the next realm where he used a Parliament Funkadelic sample, and rapped and danced over it. This turned a lot of Black people on around the country. A lot of black people gravitated to Hammer at first. The rap community in new York looked down upon his style because itwas rap that was coming from another place with another feel to it. So the rappers in the east thought it was corny. That was still player hating because when rappers went to perform in houston, Texas, and Hammer would be on the show performing with them, Hammer would get the largest crowd response. I've seen it happen in front of my own face.
Then Hammer did the groundbreaking album "Please Hammer Don't Hurt 'Em". That record came out and was tremendously popular in Black communities outside of New York because the samples could be related to by older people. Hammer's raps were simple enough, he danced, and he put on a show. So a lot of people could relate to that. The rap purists from the East Coast, who were black, trashed the idea. They were killing the idea. Just like they "player hated" and killed a lot of ideas that were coming from places outside of New York. Artists that had accents in their voices were relating with their audiences a lot better than artists from the Northeast. Artist that used funk in their records were getting better results than artists that used faster aspects of soul in their records. Artists that were doing more things with their shows were getting results. Therefore it fostered this "antisentiment" toward anything that didn't come out of the Northeast. When white kids follow black culture they don't come in with their own point of view or opinion, they follow the black pinion. Then they come with an opinion on top of that. That's where the danger comes in. It was like, "Hey, I'm white, I'm inside the culture now because there's this black antisentiment toward this situation. I agree with that and now I can add more fuel to the fire." A lot of the white kids would pick up information that was lying around the side and actually be legitimate in their criticism, then whites would go from just criticizing to damn near being considred authorities. When white folks consider themselves authorities on something Black we have to watch that.
Hammer didn't do anything different on Please Hammer Don't Hurt 'Em than anything he did before. He rapped on nontraditional rap music: things like Rick James and the Chi-Lites, rapped over them in his own particular way, performed well over them, brought a whole different performing style that was not traditional to the rap game, and I saw Hammer go from starting out on a Black vibe to this thing that everybody thought was nonBlack. I couldn't understand where the nonblackness was in it. He was dancing, which we do. He was using the Chi-Lites and Rick James, which we listen to, and he was rapping over it in his own way, which was. as a matter of fact he was using aspects of gospel that had never been used. When I saw that happen to hammer that's when I started to see the dreaded apocalypse for certain things that eventually happened to us. I did things that I thought cut through as being diferent and against the grain of the expectations. Hip-hop is bigger than any one person's opinion of what it should be."(Pgs. 149-152 Chuck D)

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