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Paris Goes Directly Back to Jail

by Sarah Hall

Easy come, easy go for Paris Hilton.

A day after she was "reassigned" from jail to house arrest due to an undisclosed medical condition, the hotel heiress was sent back to the slammer by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael T. Sauer, the same judge who originally sentenced her to 45 days for violating her probation on an alcohol-related driving charge.

The judge ordered that Hilton return to Century Regional Detention Facility in Lynwood, California, to serve out at least 23 days. [see video of the announcement.]

After hearing the verdict, a weeping Hilton was escorted from the courtroom by a female deputy, shrieking, "It's not right! Mom!"

Her lawyer was said to be readying an appeal.

The 26-year-old socialite had not intended to be present in court Friday, but upon learning that she was planning on phoning in her testimony rather than putting in a personal appearance, Sauer ordered the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department to send a squad car to pick her up at her Hollywood Hills home and escort her to the courthouse.

An O.J. Simpson-in-the-white-Bronco-esque scene ensued, with swarms of news helicopters trailing the police convoy as it transported Hilton to the hearing.

Hilton dressed for the occasion in a oversize gray sweatshirt and sloppy slacks, with her hair tied back in a ponytail and her face free of makeup.

She cried and shook visibly throughout the hearing, and turned several times to mouth, "I love you," to her parents, who were seated behind her.

Her attorney, Richard Hutton, asked the judge to order a hearing in his chambers to hear testimony about Hilton's medical condition, but Sauer did not comply with the request.

Another defense attorney argued that the court's role "is to let the Sheriff's Department run the jail."

Sauer said he had never approved Sheriff Lee Baca's decision to send Hilton home.

"I at no time condoned the actions of the sheriff and at no time told him I approved the actions," Sauer said. "At no time did I approve the defendant being released from custody to her home."

The judge also said that he had received a call from an undersheriff on Wednesday advising him that Hilton had a medical condition and that he would be given paperwork to consider in the case.

"I never received medical documents. The sheriff's office still has done nothing," he said.

Shortly thereafter, he announced: "The defendant is remanded to county jail to serve the remainder of her 45-day sentence. This order is forthwith."

Hilton screamed, while her mother, Cathy, collapsed into her husband Rick's arms, groaning, "Oh my God!"

The Simple Life star's reversal of fortune took place after the Los Angeles city attorney filed court documents Thursday afternoon, demanding that she be returned to the Century Regional Detention Facility to complete her sentence.

City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo praised Sauer's decision Friday.

"This decision sends the message that no individual—no matter how wealthy or powerful—is above the law. Today, justice was served," he said in a statement.

City prosecutors had also asked that the Sheriff's Department be held in contempt of court for violating the judge's original order by allowing the heiress to leave jail and be fitted with an electronic monitoring bracelet. The judge did not address the issue during Friday's hearing.

Baca defended his decision to reassign Hilton to house arrest, stating it was based solely on her "medical issue," and said that the county legal team had records to support Hilton's diagnosis that it could have turned over to the judge.

"I can't speak to what's in the judge's mind, but it appears to me at this point there is not a lot of communication," Baca told the Los Angeles Times.

There has been no word on what exactly ails Hilton. Observers in the courtroom said she looked physically ill and repeatedly wiped her nose, and a doctor was seen going to her home Thursday night.

Others have suggested it could be a psychological issue. Hilton was visited by her psychiatrist twice during her initial three-day incarceration amid reports of her being unable to eat and or stop crying; another source tells E! Online that Hilton suffers from claustrophobia and that may have contributed to her condition.

After she was reassigned to house arrest Thursday, the heiress issued a statement expressing gratitude to the Sheriff's Department and her jailers.

"I want to thank the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department and staff of the Century Regional Detention Center for treating me fairly and professionally," she said. "I am going to serve the remaining 40 days of my sentence.

"I have learned a great deal from this ordeal and hope that others have learned from my mistakes."

Now she has the opportunity to learn even more.

Breaking news. More to come.

Copyright 2007 E! Entertainment Television, Inc. All rights reserved.

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:yeahthat: I had a professor for a journalism class this past semester who must be having a fit right now lol. He's a former New York Times reporter, and all he'd do was rant to us about how inane what the media spends time and energy covering is - and, conversely of course, how important stuff falls through the cracks and slips out of the public's consciousness before it even enters it. Prime example, much? :susel[1]:

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You and me both Tim.. i could care less about this nonsense. when there's more important things going on in the world than this crap!!!

DEJAVOUZ .... I have had nightmares of being in Iraq,..so i can imagine how awful a mother must feel seeing this sort of media coverage.

Maybe if people like Paris would be allowed to visit a military bootcamp for one day of their sentence,.. and she share her experience, ONLY then would I say that she has learned a valuable lesson in life..

or visit a trauma center with victims of drunk drivers,... The law should be taken serious with probation violations, because its not a light matter.

Thx 4 the post...

xo,

cookie

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i'm just trying to ignore this whole thing cause this woman is getting on my last nerves

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I just find the media hysteria over this beyind a joke.. I really dont care at this point :sipread:

While I agree with the initial media coverage of the her going to jail, I think her subsequent release does warrent at least some coverage. I haven't been following it more than what's been posted here, but it seems as though there was some corruption involved. If there was, or if there may have been some corruption, I would think that it warrents news coverage.

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You and me both Tim.. i could care less about this nonsense. when there's more important things going on in the world than this crap!!!

DEJAVOUZ .... I have had nightmares of being in Iraq,..so i can imagine how awful a mother must feel seeing this sort of media coverage.

Maybe if people like Paris would be allowed to visit a military bootcamp for one day of their sentence,.. and she share her experience, ONLY then would I say that she has learned a valuable lesson in life..

or visit a trauma center with victims of drunk drivers,... The law should be taken serious with probation violations, because its not a light matter.

Thx 4 the post...

xo,

cookie

Those are great ideas cookies. Sometimes, the best way for people to understand what the consequences of their actions could be is to actually see what could have happened. There is a reason why there are laws. Seeing someone in a trauma center would be a great illustration as to why that is.

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You and me both Tim.. i could care less about this nonsense. when there's more important things going on in the world than this crap!!!

DEJAVOUZ .... I have had nightmares of being in Iraq,..so i can imagine how awful a mother must feel seeing this sort of media coverage.

Maybe if people like Paris would be allowed to visit a military bootcamp for one day of their sentence,.. and she share her experience, ONLY then would I say that she has learned a valuable lesson in life..

or visit a trauma center with victims of drunk drivers,... The law should be taken serious with probation violations, because its not a light matter.

Thx 4 the post...

xo,

cookie

Those are great ideas cookies. Sometimes, the best way for people to understand what the consequences of their actions could be is to actually see what could have happened. There is a reason why there are laws. Seeing someone in a trauma center would be a great illustration as to why that is.

yeah it will be better to spent one of da days there ,will works ... atleast for some of the ppl will make effect

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What I can't understand is how this brat thinks it's unfair. I say they should have thrown her butt in with real criminals. If you brake the law then you should go to prison like everybody else.

I'm so sick of her and all of her "friends". They are a bunch of pretentious little brats who don't know what it means to actually have to work for a living. I really want to go off but my nature as a gentleman will prevent me from doing so.

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What I can't understand is how this brat thinks it's unfair. I say they should have thrown her butt in with real criminals. If you brake the law then you should go to prison like everybody else.

I'm so sick of her and all of her "friends". They are a bunch of pretentious little brats who don't know what it means to actually have to work for a living. I really want to go off but my nature as a gentleman will prevent me from doing so.

Well Paris didn't have to work at all, but she did. She worked in movies, recorded albums, did clothing lines, made TV shows. She could have sat around and done nothing with her life..

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I just find the media hysteria over this beyind a joke.. I really dont care at this point :sipread:

While I agree with the initial media coverage of the her going to jail, I think her subsequent release does warrent at least some coverage. I haven't been following it more than what's been posted here, but it seems as though there was some corruption involved. If there was, or if there may have been some corruption, I would think that it warrents news coverage.

We scoff at Paris, but we're her clients

Waleed Aly

June 10, 2007

SANCTIMONIOUS contempt for Paris Hilton is easy. This narrative is familiar by now: she glorifies and glamorises all that is deleterious in society; her apparent stupidity is celebrated almost as much as her ravenous sexuality; the heiress to a fortune, her only job appears to be party-going; she has no discernible talent and produces nothing of note, except the odd homemade sex video.

Here, then, is the quintessential object of highbrow derision: undeservedly rich, unashamedly vacuous, and unabashedly raunchy. Paris is truly famous for being famous. But such fashionable moralising is often a self-exonerating mask. By passing judgement on Paris we allow ourselves to pretend that we are not, as a society, so gleefully transfixed by her. To admit jealousy — or worse, admiration — at the way she saunters through celebrity life would be too obviously demeaning. It feels better to condemn.

Meanwhile, we insist on consuming her. It's difficult to remember a week passing without Paris invading our news stream. Yet we keep our eyes fixed on the screen and our heads buried in our magazines. In truth, we are not Paris' critics. We are her clients.

If proof is required, the past week has provided it. Last Monday, Paris finally entered prison to serve half of a 45-day sentence for driving with a suspended licence. Three days later, she was released on house arrest, only to be re-institutionalised. This much, I confess, is worthy of mild interest. But no more.

It is not altogether surprising that Paris might fall foul of the law, and a prison sentence measured in days is not a grave punishment. It's almost a retreat.

Yet we have been subjected to daily news updates of the most mundane nature. "Paris survives first night in jail" boomed one headline, nakedly highlighting how hard-hitting and substantive this story was not. Mercifully, we were reassured, she was allowed to keep her hair extensions in prison because they were "tightly wound". Who'd have thought?

Day two brought us news of an outbreak of staph infection bacteria in the prison. The situation rapidly deteriorated. Paris paid for a visit from her psychiatrist "in the first sign she may not be coping". Can reporters possibly maintain this frenetic pace for three weeks?

Yet, whatever the inanity, we continue to watch, download and read. Surely this has been the low-water mark in our Paris obsession. Voyeuristic interest in sex videos, even if contemptible, is at least comprehensible. But this story is not even titillating. It is simply empty: the news equivalent of belly button lint.

Or perhaps it is worse. Perhaps our capacity to find interest in even the most mind-numbing celebrity stories reflects a more profound stagnation in us: that we are increasingly not a people who do, but rather a people who watch. Maybe our day-to-day lives are now so burdened that we are no longer able to live them fully. Instead we live them vicariously through others.

Whatever the case, it is not healthy. Our scoffing at Paris more truthfully condemns ourselves. It is difficult to escape the thought that our obsession with celebrity banality is an admission of existential defeat.

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