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*Official* Lost and Found Review Post

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The biggest swedish paper gave L&F 1 out of 5, the next largest gave it 1 out of 5 too...

With all respect to you guys from sweden, such as lerkot, but damn sweden :kekeke:

Ahh well, you still got the sexy girls innit :wiggle:

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The biggest danish paper gave it 4 out of 5.

And one of the things that was said in the rewiew was:

"everybody wants to hate Will, but you can't this album is just to great." :afro:

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Ahhhh, Sweden ain't nothing but a thing.

heey! don't hate on us, Will loves us! Our newspapers are just known for being some wack punk b*tches

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Smith gets serious, but still shows fun side

Darryl Sterdan, Special to The Free Press 2005-04-09 02:55:01

LOST AND FOUND

WILL SMITH INTERSCOPE/UNIVERSAL

Will Smith albums are a lot like Will Smith movies: Most of the time they're enjoyable and entertaining, if a tad safe and predictable. Every now and then, though, Smith seems to make a concerted effort to earn some respect with a flick such as Ali. Or a CD such as Lost and Found. Smith's fourth solo disc is his most revealing and serious release, with personal tracks tackling everything from religious intolerance and past lovers to 9/11 and the evils of modern society. Not that's Big Willie's suddenly turned into Chuck D or anything; Mr. Smith still gets jiggy wit it on lightweight cuts such as Here He Comes (based on samples from TV's Spider-Man theme) and If U Can't Dance (which seems inspired by Hitch). And he pokes fun at his squeaky-clean image on tracks such as Mr. Niceguy and I Wish I Made That, which finds him wondering what he has to do to get some street cred. Whether Lost and Found will bring him any is doubtful. But it might just earn him a little more respect.

London Free Press

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Smith gets serious, but still shows fun side

Darryl Sterdan, Special to The Free Press 2005-04-09 02:55:01

LOST AND FOUND

WILL SMITH INTERSCOPE/UNIVERSAL

Will Smith albums are a lot like Will Smith movies: Most of the time they're enjoyable and entertaining, if a tad safe and predictable. Every now and then, though, Smith seems to make a concerted effort to earn some respect with a flick such as Ali. Or a CD such as Lost and Found. Smith's fourth solo disc is his most revealing and serious release, with personal tracks tackling everything from religious intolerance and past lovers to 9/11 and the evils of modern society. Not that's Big Willie's suddenly turned into Chuck D or anything; Mr. Smith still gets jiggy wit it on lightweight cuts such as Here He Comes (based on samples from TV's Spider-Man theme) and If U Can't Dance (which seems inspired by Hitch). And he pokes fun at his squeaky-clean image on tracks such as Mr. Niceguy and I Wish I Made That, which finds him wondering what he has to do to get some street cred. Whether Lost and Found will bring him any is doubtful. But it might just earn him a little more respect.

London Free Press

Hmmm... tepid. Doesn't really get into the album, but it's still good promotion.

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My Lost and Found review on yahoo...

Pros: Lyrical depth, uplifting messages, and plenty of wit and humor to spare

Cons: none

It is evident from the very first listen that Will

Smith put a great deal of time, creativity and

thoughtfullness into this project. The album grabs you

from the very onset and you don't find yourself

skipping any of the tracks, it's that good! In

interviews and promotional appearances for the album,

Mr. Smith has mentioned several times that this is the

most indepth/introspective writing he has ever done as

a rapper and he wasn't kidding. He speaks on

subjects near and dear to his heart with such emotion

and honesty that it is a shame hip hop had lost him to

Hollywood to the extent it has. "Tell Me Why"

feat. Mary J. Blige is a primary example of this. Here,

he tries to make sense of the "craziness"

taking place in the world while at the same time

pondering how to explain this craziness to his

children, touching on subjects from 9/11 to the passing

of hip hop greats and finally coming to a personal

conclusion on how to deal with all that is taking place

in the world. Songs such as "Loretta" and

"Mrs. Holy Roller" also display Will's

lyrical prowess as well as the title track "Lost

and Found" which has him pondering the state of

hip hop and the rap game today.

But this is not just a serious album. I guarantee you

that when you hear "Party Starter," you

won't know what to do with yourself, and other

tracks like "Pump Ya Brakes" and "If You

Can't Dance" will certainly have you moving

towards the dance floor, rhythm or not. If you're a

hip hop head, this is a must have. If you're a

casual listener, this is a must have. If you can tap

your feet to music on beat... at least sometimes...

this is a must have.

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Friday, April 8, 2005

CD reviews

Will Smith, "Lost and Found"

By Mekeisha Madden Toby / The Detroit News

Only in hip hop can a musician be nominated for an Oscar and still drop albums. Will Smith is an attractive and talented Hollywood star. Does Smith or "Big Will," as the 36-year-old husband and father calls himself, really need to rap? And what's up with the thug gear he's sporting in photos on the CD jacket? Sorry, but Smith is too GQ and too old to be a hood. Back to the music. Smith attempts to answer the unlikely rapper question on several tracks on his new album "Lost and Found," in which Smith attacks those who have attacked him on "Mr. Niceguy" and "I Wish I Made That" in which he pays homage to rappers he admires. And while the album does have a few hits, it's really hard to take it seriously. That said, if you can get beyond the movie star-rapper's persona, you will nod your head to the Ludacris-esque "Party Starter," smile in agreement with the message on "Ms. Holy Roller" and perhaps even dance to "Pump Ya Brakes," featuring Snoop Dogg. Good luck with that. GRADE: B

source: http://www.detnews.com/2005/cdreviews/0504/09/E09-143491.htm

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Yeah I guess your rite Jin :hilarious: It's funny to me that VH1 mention the samething on Best Week Ever. Said Will was wearing a prison shirt he trying to be gangsta. Their were talking about 46664. they didn't know what it was :hilarious:

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My Lost and Found review on yahoo...

Pros: Lyrical depth, uplifting messages, and plenty of wit and humor to spare

Cons: none

It is evident from the very first listen that Will

Smith put a great deal of time, creativity and

thoughtfullness into this project. The album grabs you

from the very onset and you don't find yourself

skipping any of the tracks, it's that good! In

interviews and promotional appearances for the album,

Mr. Smith has mentioned several times that this is the

most indepth/introspective writing he has ever done as

a rapper and he wasn't kidding. He speaks on

subjects near and dear to his heart with such emotion

and honesty that it is a shame hip hop had lost him to

Hollywood to the extent it has. "Tell Me Why"

feat. Mary J. Blige is a primary example of this. Here,

he tries to make sense of the "craziness"

taking place in the world while at the same time

pondering how to explain this craziness to his

children, touching on subjects from 9/11 to the passing

of hip hop greats and finally coming to a personal

conclusion on how to deal with all that is taking place

in the world. Songs such as "Loretta" and

"Mrs. Holy Roller" also display Will's

lyrical prowess as well as the title track "Lost

and Found" which has him pondering the state of

hip hop and the rap game today.

But this is not just a serious album. I guarantee you

that when you hear "Party Starter," you

won't know what to do with yourself, and other

tracks like "Pump Ya Brakes" and "If You

Can't Dance" will certainly have you moving

towards the dance floor, rhythm or not. If you're a

hip hop head, this is a must have. If you're a

casual listener, this is a must have. If you can tap

your feet to music on beat... at least sometimes...

this is a must have.

Now that's a good review man!!

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Yeah I guess your rite Jin :hilarious: It's funny to me that VH1 mention the samething on Best Week Ever. Said Will was wearing a prison shirt he trying to be gangsta. Their were talking about 46664. they didn't know what it was :hilarious:

:hilarious: :hilarious: :hilarious:

They never stopped to ask themselves what the significance of the number is... lol

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Will Smith – Lost And Found Review

Posted By Michael Melchor on 03.31.05

This is not your father’s Will Smi—oh, wait...

Many people know that Will Smith is a $20 million-per-picture movie star with a penchant for summer blockbusters. Many also know that he started not on “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air”, but as the Fresh Prince, rapping with his partner, DJ Jazzy Jeff.

Ever since he took to making music under his real name and ditching the “Fresh Prince” moniker, Will Smith’s music seems to have suffered as it’s been paint-by-numbers dance and pop instead of some of the more clever rhymes he devised during the days of “Parents Just Don’t Understand” and “I Think I Can beat Mike Tyson”. However, on Lost And Found, Will seems invigorated and ready to leave “Big Willie” behind.

The cleverness starts right away on “Here He Comes”, an intro track re-written from the old “Spider Man” TV show theme that comes out pretty well given Smith’s mental dexterity. That drive – and apparently a new anger – drive Will on through the rest of the anger.

After a couple “good-time” songs (“Party Starter” and “Switch”), Smith goes on a rampage starting with the album’s most controversial track, “Mr. Niceguy”. Smith spends a couple lines each on select targets and gives his responses to their criticisms in succinct and toxic fashion. On the subject of Eminem, Smith responds that:

Dissed by Em but did it bother him (yup)

But he classy Big Will just get another 20 mil

And walk right pass E

That simple, factual, and dismissive sort of response characterizes Smith perfectly. He knows his accomplishments and stature and would rather not be bothered with this sort of thing (even saying on Mr. Niceguy” that, “Truth be told this ain’t my style”). The venom is there, however, between those who criticize him and the ills of the world – and that venom takes form not only in some of the classiest diss tracks to hit the air, but also in taking on the rap game and the rest of the industry.

The title track, “Lost And Found”, sees Smith responding to all of his peers with statements that he doesn’t want to sound like the rest because he doesn’t have to (“Why should I try to sound like ya’ll sound/That’s what’s wrong with the rap game right now “). Just to bring the point home, Smith displays his accomplishments and influences:

Yo the first ever rap grammy

Let’s talk about the only reason yo ass went to Miami

(Yup) truck wit rims (check) throw back jersey (check)

champagne bottles (check) lot’s of models (check)

Damn that’s the list for 90 percent of ya’ll videos and songs

Am I wrong

“I Wish I Made That” gives props to other artists while taking aim at the industry that wouldn’t give him the time of day as he was still selling platinum. Using a chorus that incorporates his evny (a piece of Snoop Dogg’s “Drop it Like It’s Hot”) and his ismay at being overlooked for several years (a piece of his own “Summertime”), the song leads straight to a collaboration with Snoop Dogg. After a streak of rage, Snoop implores Will Smith to “Pump Ya Brakes” and calm down in a brilliant bit of album pacing.

After that, the party starts again with “If U Can’t Dance”, seeing Smith return to his nicer nature (although the wordplay is still intact). The album moves at a good clip here with more nimble lyricism but with a much better feeling. “Could U Love Me” is an ode to being loved without the fame and fortune, wondering if it can be done. All the while, Smith can still flow with the best of them.

The music here has plenty of funk and grooves, but seems more stripped-down. Before the record came out, Smith stated that this album would be more relaxed; something you could play at a party but also chill to. Executive producer Omarr “O. Banga” Rambert sees to that, and the result is an infectious backdrop for Smith, whether he’s giddy or angry.

The 411

Lost And Found is more Will Smith than anything he’s put out in the last 15 years. The goofiness of the “Big Willie” era is gone, and instead is a more personal record with shades of the “Fresh Prince”. The result is an enjoyable record that, while may seem to some like a bore, should please most rap afficianados.

Final Score:7.5

http://www.411mania.com/newdesign/music/re...reviews_id=4122

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